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High School

Grades 9-12

Engaging Minds: Free Online High School in Ohio

OHDELA offers a full time, tuition-free online high school program for students Grades 9-12. In recent times, academics have been trending toward online education. Unlike other traditional schools that have transitioned to online learning, OHDELA’s online high school was built for digital learning.

Our dedicated teachers are specifically trained to work with students in an online setting and help high school students earn credit toward graduation.

Accel Management Platform for Education curriculum offers rich and engaging content that has been carefully designed to meet the standards required by states. Students are engaged in a variety of activities and assessments appropriate to the courses being studied, including labs, journals, written assignments, discussions, group and individual projects, formative assessments, objective tests, and written exams. OHDELA’s online high school helps prepare students for success after graduation.

ENGLISH 1

English 1A: Students explore reading, writing, and analysis using both informational and literary texts, as well as comparison of texts in different mediums. Readings include The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald, among others, to demonstrate understanding of textual evidence, themes, central ideas, inferences, word choice, and figurative and connotative language, and grammar and usage. Writings include a personal narrative (memoir) and a literary analysis.

English 1B: Students explore reading, writing, and analysis using both informational and literary texts. Readings include Anthem by Ayn Rand, among other texts of varying time periods to demonstrate concepts such as textual evidence, themes, central ideas, characters, inferences, rhetorical techniques, structure and style, and arguments and claims. Writing topics include grammar, usage, punctuation, spelling, style manuals, phrases, and clauses, culminating in an informational essay and an argument essay

ENGLISH 2

English 2A: English 2A examines reading, writing, and analysis of informational texts, argument texts, and
videos to demonstrate understanding of explicit and inferred meaning, textual evidence, central ideas, arguments and claims, organizational structures, figurative and rhetorical language, and the effect of word choice on tone. Skill building focuses on spelling, grammar, usage, punctuation, domain-specific vocabulary, context clues, and affixes. Writing topics include an informational essay and an argument essay

English 2B: English 2B explores reading, writing, and analysis of literary texts from around the world and across history. Readings include Antigone by Sophocles, among others to demonstrate understanding of textual evidence, themes, inferences, characterization, figurative language, figures of speech, and literary devices, as well as building about foundational knowledge of context clues, word nuances, affixes, phrases, clauses, and parallel construction. Writing topics include a literary analysis essay and a personal narrative essay.

ENGLISH 3

English 3A: English 3A examines reading, writing, and analysis using both informational and argument texts. Readings include seminal US texts such as “What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?” by Frederick Douglass, speeches, court documents, and scientific articles to explore textual evidence, central ideas, inferences, word choice, figurative language, spelling, hyphens, contested usage, figures of speech, and reference materials. Writing topics include a researched informational essay and a researched argument essay.

English 3B: English 3B explores reading, writing, and analysis using both informational and literary texts. Readings include poetry and drama, such The Crucible by Arthur Miller to demonstrate literary elements of plot, setting, character, themes, and central ideas. Comparing works from different time periods, reviewing context and word nuances, and learning about punctuation, style manuals, phrases, clauses, and parallel structure to improve reading and writing skills. Writing topics include a fictional narrative and a literary analysis.

ENGLISH 4

English 4A: English 4A explores analysis of informational and argument texts. Readings include seminal US
texts such as the Declaration of Independence, presidential speeches, court documents, and articles related to innovative technology to demonstrate rhetoric, figurative language, theme, purpose, specialized vocabulary, text structure, word nuances, inferences, research, evidence, and reference sources. In addition, students learn about context clues, contested usage, and syntax errors. Writings include a researched informational essay and a researched argument essay.

English 4B: English 4B analyzes narrative texts from British literature—from the Middle Ages through modern times. Demonstrated skills include explicit and implicit meanings, figurative language, literary devices, central ideas, themes, and narrative and structural elements. Writings include a fictional narrative in the style of Gothic Romanticism and a literary analysis comparing and contrasting two British literature texts of different eras.

ALGEBRA 1

Semester A introduces students to the world of Algebra through expressions and equations. Students will evaluate algebraic expressions, solve linear equations and graph them. This course also steers students through various real-world scenarios with the emphasis on using basic statistics to interpret the information given and found. Students learn through online lesson materials, videos and interactive activities. The end of each unit tests students’ understanding with a self-check quiz with feedback. Also included is a unit exam and project for students to apply what they have learned. Teacher feedback is provided throughout the semester.

Semester B builds on the concepts learned in the first semester by providing a strong foundation in solving problems. Students will work with problems and applications that involve exponents, quadratic equations, polynomials and factoring methods, rational and radical equations, data analysis and probability. Students will interact with course materials through online lessons, videos, interactive questions and real-world applications. Each unit ends with a self-check quiz to confirm knowledge of the concepts learned. There is also a unit exam and project. Teacher feedback is given throughout the course.

ALGEBRA 2

This course further extends the learner’s understanding of major algebra concepts, and prepares them with the building blocks needed to dive deeper into trigonometry, pre-calculus and advanced probability and statistics. Topics include radicals, quadratic functions and equations, polynomials, rationals, systems of equations and inequalities, exponents and logarithms, sequences and series, probability and statistics and trigonometry.

CONSUMER MATH

This course focuses on the mathematics involved in making wise consumer decisions. Students explore the many ways in which mathematics affects their daily lives. The first semester will cover paychecks and wages, taxes, insurance, budgets, bank accounts, credit cards, interest calculations, and comparison shopping. Second semester topics include vehicle and home purchasing, investing, and business and employee management.

GEOMETRY

Semester A – Geometry is the study of the measurement of the world. What makes Geometry so engaging is the relationship of figures and measures to each other, and how these relationships can predict results in the world around us. Through practical applications, the student sees how geometric reasoning provides insight into everyday life. The course begins with the tools needed in Geometry. From these foundations, the student explores the measure of line segments, angles, and two-dimensional figures. Students will learn about similarity, triangles and trigonometric ratios. Geometry A consists of six modules. Each module comprises ten lessons for a total of 60 lessons in the course.

Semester B – This course builds on the foundation of the first terms in Geometry. As in previous courses, deductive and inductive reasoning are emphasized, while applying problem-solving techniques to real-world problems. Students explore quadrilaterals and circles, and learn how an object is transformed, as well as how to represent that transformation algebraically and geometrically. Students calculate area and volume of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional objects. Geometry B consists of six modules. Each module comprises ten lessons for a total of 60 lessons in the course.

PRE-CALCULUS

In this course, students will understand and apply concepts, graphs and applications of a variety of families of functions, including polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, logistic and trigonometric. An emphasis will be placed on use of appropriate functions to model real world situations and solve problems that arise from those situations. A focus is also on graphing functions by hand and understanding and identifying the parts of a graph. A scientific and/or graphics calculator is recommended for work on assignments, and on examinations. Pre-Calculus Part B covers the major units of Introductory Trigonometry and Graphs, Trigonometric Equations and Identities, Analytical Trigonometry, Sequences and Series, Conic Sections and an Introduction to Calculus. A focus is also on graphing functions by hand and understanding and identifying the parts of a graph.

AMERICAN HISTORY

Semester A: Creation of a Nation – This course covers the discovery, development, and growth of the United States. Major topics include; American Indian cultures, European colonization of the Americas, and the causes and effects of the American Revolution. Geographical, economic, and political factors are explores as the key factors in the growth of the United States of America. American History I is a survey of the struggle to build the United States of America from the colonial period to the beginning of the twentieth century. By means of reading, analyzing, and applying historical data, students come to appreciate the forces that shaped our history and character as an American people. Not only are the topics of American history discussed, but students also explore research methods and determine accurate sources of data from the past. Knowing the facts and dates of history are just the beginning: each student must understand how history affects him or her.

Semester B: Expansion of a Nation – American History B begins with a study of American life before the 1929 Stock Market crash and how the Roaring Twenties influenced society in the late 19th through early 20th centuries. Students will examine the causes and consequences of the Great Depression and move on into a detailed study of World War II with an emphasis on America’s role in the conflict. The course continues with an analysis of the Cold War struggle and America’s rise as a superpower. The Civil Rights and Women’s rights movements, pollution and the environment, and American domestic and foreign policy will be examined. The course wraps up with a summary of current events and issues, including a study of the Middle East. This course begins with an assessment of life in United States pre-World War I and ends with the conflicts of the new millennium. Students look at the nation in terms of economic, social, and political trends. The experiences of the last century are summarized, including a look into the civil rights issues that have embroiled the nation in conflict. The development of the United States of America into a superpower is explored within a global context.

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

This course will guide students through an in-depth study of the history, structure, and guiding principles of American government. The first unit will review the origins of government in general and American government in particular—from the earliest models for democracy to the founding documents that created a federalist system of government in the U.S. Several units will help students explore the roles and responsibilities of each branch of government as well as the impact that the Constitution has had and continues to have on the way government works and on the lives of individual Americans. The course’s final unit will guide students through a series of projects that require them to apply what they have learned about American government to an issue that interests them.

WORLD HISTORY

Semester A – World History begins with a focus on the skills needed to read, understand, and analyze history, also demonstrating how historians and social scientists arrive at their conclusions about human history.  Semester A covers the history of civilization from hunter-gatherer societies through the characteristics of the earliest civilizations to the Enlightenment period in Western Europe. The second half of Semester A explores early intellectual, spiritual, and political movements and their impact on interactions among world cultures.

Semester B – Semester B applies the reading and analytical strategies introduced in Semester A to the events and movements that created the modern world. In the second semester, World History emphasizes the effects of the Industrial Revolution and changing attitudes about science and religion as well as the impact of European colonization. Students are encouraged to make connections between World War I and II and events related to the Cold War and between 19th-century imperialism and modern independence movements.

ECONOMICS

This course introduces the principles and the applications of economics in everyday life. Students develop an understanding of limited resources, and compare it with unlimited wants and needs. Students learn how individual and national economic decisions are made to allocate goods and services among competing users. Students apply economic principles to think and problem solve. The study of Economics uses the view of economic institutions and policies to explore the history, organization, and functions of the U.S. government in controlling our economy. It offers students learning opportunities that build one on another. A goal of the course is for the student to develop the critical skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in a demanding and thoughtful academic setting. Students are encouraged to use their knowledge of the policies and institutions of economics to develop their own views on current economic and monetary issues. They are taught how to apply what they have learned into personal financial activities. The course looks closely at the economic knowledge and values of the country and gives students a look into the problems faced by presidents, and congressional representatives. It also covers the roles of political activists, political parties, interest groups, and the media in shaping the U. S. economy. The Supreme Court is presented as the voice of reason in the balance of powers. Students are encouraged to perform at higher levels as they are presented with historical documents and additional readings, work with a set of facts arranged by theme, become skillful in note-taking, and join in student discussions. Students develop and demonstrate their writing skills by preparing extended research-based papers.

CHEMISTRY

Semester A – In this course, students will discover what chemistry is, and how it is used and found all around us. The importance of the scientific method to solve real world problems will be investigated. Knowledge will be gained in the following areas: types of matter, atomic structure, chemical periodicity, chemical formula writing and naming, chemical equations. This course will also stress the important relationship between math and science while studying measurement, metric system and stoichiometry. Students will use higher order thinking throughout the entire course. An algebra background is recommended because of the amount and type of math involved.

Semester B – It follows the Chemistry 1 A course. In Chemistry 1 B, students will investigate chemical bonding, thermochemistry, and acids and bases. The importance of the scientific method to solve real world problems will be investigated. Knowledge will be gained in the following areas: organic chemistry, biochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. This course will also stress the important relationship between math and science. Students will use higher order thinking throughout the entire course. An algebra background is recommended because of the amount and type of math involved.

PHYSICS

Semester A – Students begin their exploration of physics by reviewing the International System of Units (SI), scientific notation, and significant digits. They then learn to describe and analyze motion in one and two dimensions. Students learn about gravity and Newton’s laws of motion before concluding the course with an examination of circular motion. Students apply mathematical concepts such as graphing and trigonometry in order to solve physics problems. Throughout the course, students apply their understanding of physics by playing roles like science museum curator and elementary teacher.

Semester B – Physics B continues the student’s exploration of mechanics while also guiding them through some other important topics of physics.  Students begin by exploring simple harmonic motion, wave properties, and optics. Students then learn the basics of thermodynamics and fluids. Afterwards, the students explore the principles of electricity and magnetism. Finally, students explore the area of physics known as Modern Physics, which includes topics such as the photoelectric effect, nuclear science, and relativity. This is a trig based course. It is assumed you know and can use trigonometry.

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY

Semester A – The aim of this course is to expand upon what was learned in your Biology class, while emphasizing the application of this material to human structures and functions. This course begins the study of human beings at the microscopic level and works its way up to an in-depth study of select organ systems. Special emphasis will be placed upon applying and demonstrating the information learned in this course through, not only tests and quizzes, but through special projects and collaboration as well.

Semester B – Part B is designed to give the student an understanding of how structure and function are related in the human body. The student will study the human body from the cellular level to the organ system level. All of the major body systems will be studied in great detail. Additionally, biochemistry, cell biology, histology, biotechnology, bioethics, and pathology will also be studied. This course is highly recommended for students seeking a career in science or a health-related profession.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Semester A – The first three modules of Semester 1 cover Scientific Inquiry, the Structure and Composition of the Universe, and the Features of the Solar System. Students learn the importance of scientific inquiry and how to communicate the results of scientific investigations. They then have material on the formation of the universe, including the Big Bang Theory, the motions of celestial objects, and stellar evolution. The third module covers material related to the Solar System, including features of the Sun and the planets and the movements of Earth. The second three modules of Semester 1 cover Weather, Climate, and Earth’s Water Cycle. Students first learn in Module 4 about the atmosphere and clouds, as well as the factors that influence local and global climate. In Module 5 they continue by learning about weather and air masses, meteorology and storms. Module 6 then discusses the water cycle, including groundwater and ocean features, as well as water scarcity and pollution.

Semester B – The first three modules of Semester 2 cover the physical structure of the Earth and Earth’s tectonic system, including the rock cycle, tectonic activity, and mountain building. It then covers weathering and erosion and soil formation. The next material in the course then addresses the concept of systems; it addresses the Earth as a system, feedback in systems, and Earth’s major nutrient cycles. The second three modules of Semester 2 cover geologic history, including the evolution of Earth’s atmosphere, the geologic time scale, and the fossil record. It then goes over natural resources and the effects of human population on natural resources. The course wraps up with a discussion of human society and its interconnectedness with the Earth’s environment, how science and technology work together, and the technological design process in earth science applications.

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

Semester A – This is an introduction to the Physical Sciences and scientific methodology. The objectives are to impart a basic knowledge of the physical properties and chemistry of matter. Skills are developed in the classroom, and reinforced through homework reading, and interesting labs that relate to everyday life.

Semester B – This is an introduction to the Physical Sciences and scientific methodology. The objectives are to impart a basic knowledge of the physical properties and chemistry of matter. Skills are developed in the classroom, and reinforced through homework reading, and interesting labs that relate to everyday life.

American Sign Language (1 credit)

Semester A
Did you know that American Sign Language (ASL) is the third most commonly used language in North America? American Sign Language 1a: Introduction will introduce you to vocabulary and simple sentences, so that you can start communicating right away. Importantly, you will explore Deaf culture – social beliefs, traditions, history, values and communities influenced by deafness.

Semester B
The predominant sign language of Deaf communities in the United States, American Sign Language is a complex and robust language. American Sign Language 1b: Learn to Sign will introduce you to more of this language and its grammatical structures. You will expand your vocabulary by exploring interesting topics like Deaf education and Deaf arts and culture.

Anatomy & Physiology (1 credit)

Semester A
The aim of this course is to expand upon what was learned in your Biology class, while emphasizing the application of this material to human structures and functions. This course begins the study of human beings at the microscopic level and works its way up to an in-depth study of select organ systems. Special emphasis will be placed upon applying and demonstrating the information learned in this course through, not only tests and quizzes, but through special projects and collaboration as well.

Semester B
Part B is designed to give the student an understanding of how structure and function are related in the human body. The student will study the human body from the cellular level to the organ system level. All of the major body systems will be studied in great detail. Additionally, biochemistry, cell biology, histology, biotechnology, bioethics, and pathology will also be studied. This course is highly recommended for students seeking a career in science or a health-related profession.
*Prerequisites: Biology and Physical Science

Art Appreciation (½ credit)

What makes an artwork a masterpiece? Why do artists create art? What is the difference between Rococo and Art Nouveau? In this course, students will discover the answers to these questions and more. We examine the elements of art and principles of design, and explore how artists have used these elements and principles in the creation of art for centuries.

Art History (½ credit)

This Art History course integrates the four components of art study: art production, historical and cultural context, critical process and aesthetic process. Students will be able to identify and describe art from prehistoric times to modern time. Throughout this course, students will discuss various artworks, research artists, and create documents and presentations demonstrating concepts learned.

Career Planning (½ credit)

The Career Planning course guides students through the essential elements of the career planning process and the development of a defined career plan. Students will consider the many factors that impact career success and satisfaction. Using a process of investigation, research, and self-discovery, students will acquire the understandings critical to the career planning process. Upon completion of the course, students will have created a practical and comprehensive college or career transition portfolio that reflects their skills and abilities, as well as their interests, values, and goals.

Chemistry (1 credit)

Semester A
In this course, students will discover what chemistry is, and how it is used and found all around us. The importance of the scientific method to solve real world problems will be investigated. Knowledge will be gained in the following areas: types of matter, atomic structure, chemical periodicity, chemical formula writing and naming, chemical equations. This course will also stress the important relationship between math and science while studying measurement, metric system and stoichiometry. Students will use higher order thinking throughout the entire course. An algebra background is recommended because of the amount and type of math involved.

Semester B
It follows the Chemistry 1 A course. In Chemistry 1 B, students will investigate chemical bonding, thermochemistry, and acids and bases. The importance of the scientific method to solve real world problems will be investigated. Knowledge will be gained in the following areas: organic chemistry, biochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. This course will also stress the important relationship between math and science. Students will use higher order thinking throughout the entire course. An algebra background is recommended because of the amount and type of math involved.
*Prerequisites: Biology and Physical Science

Computer Basics (½ credit)

In this course you will learn how to use productivity and collaboration tools, such as G Suite by Google Cloud to create word processing documents, spreadsheets, surveys and forms such as personal budgets and invitations.

Consumer Math (1 credit)

This course focuses on the mathematics involved in making wise consumer decisions. Students explore the many ways in which mathematics affects their daily lives. The first semester will cover paychecks and wages, taxes, insurance, budgets, bank accounts, credit cards, interest calculations, and comparison shopping. Second semester topics include vehicle and home purchasing, investing, and business and employee management.

Creative Writing (½ credit)

For many hundreds of years, literature has been one of the most important human art forms. It allows us to give voice to our emotions, create imaginary worlds, express ideas, and escape the confines of material reality. Through creative writing, we can come to better understand ourselves and our world. This course can provide you with a solid grounding in the writing process, from finding inspiration to building a basic story. Then, when you are ready to go beyond the basics, learn more complicated literary techniques to create strange hybrid forms of poetry and prose. By the end of this course, you can better discover your creative thoughts and turn those ideas into fully realized pieces of creative writing.

Culinary Arts (1 credit)

Semester A
Thinking of a career in the food service industry or looking to develop your culinary skills? This introductory course will provide you with basic cooking and knife skills while preparing you for entry into the culinary world. Discover the history of food culture, food service, and global cuisines while learning about food science principles and preservation. Finally, prepare for your future by building the professional, communication, leadership, and teamwork skills that are crucial to a career in the culinary arts.

Semester B
Did you know that baking is considered a science? Building on the prior prerequisite course, discover how to elevate your culinary skills through the creation of stocks, soups, sauces, and learn baking techniques. Examine sustainable food practices and the benefits of nutrition while maintaining taste, plating, and presentation to truly wow your guests. The last unit in this course explores careers in the culinary arts for ways to channel your newfound passion!

Digital Photography (1 credit)

Semester A
Have you wondered how professional photographers manage to capture that perfect image? Gain a better understanding of photography by exploring camera functions and the elements of composition while putting theory into practice by taking your own spectacular shots! Learn how to display your work for exhibitions and develop skills important for a career as a photographer.

Semester B
Building on the prior prerequisite course, further develop your photography skills by learning more professional tips, tricks, and techniques to elevate your images. Explore various photographic styles, themes, genres, and artistic approaches. Learn more about photojournalism and how to bring you photos to life. Using this knowledge, build a portfolio of your work to pursue a career in this field!

Early Childhood Education (1 credit)

Semester A
Are you curious to see what it takes to educate and nurture early learners? Use your curiosity to explore the fundamentals of childcare, like nutrition and safety, but also the complex relationships caregivers have with parents and their children. Examine the various life stages of child development and the best educational practices to enrich their minds while thinking about a possible future as a childcare provider!

Semester B
Building on the previous prerequisite course, discover the joys of providing exceptional childcare and helping to develop future generations. Learn the importance of play and use it to build engaging educational activities that build literacy and math skills through each stage of childhood and special need. Use this knowledge to develop your professional skills well suited to a career in childcare!

Environmental Science (1 credit)

Semester A
This is an introduction to the Physical Sciences and scientific methodology. The objectives are to impart a basic knowledge of the physical properties and chemistry of matter. Skills are developed in the classroom, and reinforced through homework reading, and interesting labs that relate to everyday life.

Semester B
This is an introduction to the Physical Sciences and scientific methodology. The objectives are to impart a basic knowledge of the physical properties and chemistry of matter. Skills are developed in the classroom, and reinforced through homework reading, and interesting labs that relate to everyday life.
French 1 (1 credit) French 1 focuses on developing listening skills by repeated exposure to the spoken language. Speaking skills are encouraged through recommended assignments using voice tools. Reading and writing skills, as well as language structures, are practiced through meaningful, real-life contexts. The use of technology enhances and reinforces authentic language development and fosters cultural understandings through exposure to native speakers and their daily routines.

French 2 (1 credit)

Semester A
Semester A focuses on the continuation and enhancement of language skills presented in Level 1. Vocabulary and grammar structures are revisited and expanded to provide students an opportunity to move towards an intermediate comprehension level. Speaking and listening skills are enhanced through recommended real-life voice activities. Listening skills are honed through online dialogues. Reading and writing skills are developed through access to completion of meaningful activities, reading of culturallyrelated articles of interest and responding to reading in the target language. The use of technology enhances and reinforces authentic language development and fosters cultural understandings through exposure to native speakers and their daily routines.

Semester B
Semester B continues the enhancement of language skills. Vocabulary and grammar structures are revisited and expanded as students explore other French-speaking areas. Speaking and listening skills are enhanced through recommended real-life voice activities. Listening skills are honed through online dialogues. Reading and writing skills are developed through access to completion of meaningful activities related to travel, to the Olympics, to natural disasters, and to the space program. Reading of culturally related articles of interest and responding to reading in the target language, along with the use of technology, reinforces authentic language development and fosters cultural understandings through exposure to native speakers and their daily routines.
* Prerequisites: Successful completion of French 1

Game Design (1 credit) Semester A
Does your love of video games motivate you to pursue a career in this field? Pursue your passion by learning about the principles of game design through the stages of development, iterative process, critiques, and game development tools. Put these new skills to work by designing your own game!

Semester B
Building on the prior prerequisite course, use your creativity to develop a game from start to finish! Develop your game creation skills and practice with the tools professionals use to launch your career options in the field of game design. The content of this course also applies to certification exams.

Graphic Design (½ credit)

Graphic Design is an introduction to elements of design, spatial relationships, typography and imagery as they apply to practical visual solutions for self-promotion, resumes, logo design, Web design, and sequential systems. In this course, the student explores the basic foundations of design through a series of visual projects that explore the principles and elements of design. Students will work both with analog and digital media as they explore two-dimensional and three-dimensional design along with color theory. This course will help develop and explore a student’s ability to communicate visually.
In each lesson students acquire new skills, which take some effort. Beyond fundamental skills are various levels of creativity. Each lesson provides room for a student to express the technical skill learned in his or her own creative way.

Media and Communication (½ credit)

From banner ads to billboards, newspaper articles, and Facebook feeds, people are constantly sharing ideas. This course looks at the many facets of mass media. Students will learn how the media shapes every aspect of our lives. We examine the role of newspapers, books, magazines, radio, movies, television, and the growing influence of Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter.

Microsoft Excel (½ credit)

Discover the real world uses of Microsoft Excel and its impact upon business, academic, and personal applications. Move from inserting and manipulating data, to working with tables, charts, graphs, and calculations. Content of this course will also be applicable to the Microsoft Office Suite certification exam

Microsoft Outlook (½ credit)

Master your email and learn about Outlook’s functions to produce professional communications, helping you to succeed in business and in life. Understand effective communication techniques, working with attachments, formatting, replying, and organizing. Be prepared for your day with other features such as calendars, contacts, and tasks. Content of this course will also be applicable to the Microsoft Office Suite certification exam.
Microsoft PowerPoint (½ credit) Releasing September 2019! Learn to create clean and professional presentations while also building your skills as a speaker, leader, and marketer! Create and format presentations while inserting multimedia, images, transitions, and animations to make a dynamic final product! Content of this course will also be applicable to the Microsoft Office Suite certification exam.

Microsoft Word (½ credit)

Learn to effectively and efficiently use one of the most common tools of business, school, and personal correspondence – Microsoft Word! You will learn not only how to create word-processing documents like letters and reports, but how to style them using fonts, colors and editing tools. Discover how to format documents, create tables, use bullets and numbering, and insert images. Skills you learn in this course can be applied immediately to school and prepares you to take the MOS Word certification exam. Content of this course will also be applicable to the Microsoft Office Suite certification exam.

Music Appreciation (½ credit)

Students will gain a thorough understanding of music by studying the elements of music, musical instruments, and music history, as well as music advocacy. Students will be introduced to the orchestra and composers from around the world. They will be required to be a composer, performer, instrument inventor, and advocate.

Physics (1 credit)

Semester A
Students begin their exploration of physics by reviewing the International System of Units (SI), scientific notation, and significant digits. They then learn to describe and analyze motion in one and two dimensions. Students learn about gravity and Newton’s laws of motion before concluding the course with an examination of circular motion. Students apply mathematical concepts such as graphing and trigonometry in order to solve physics problems. Throughout the course, students apply their understanding of physics by playing roles like science museum curator and elementary teacher.

Semester B
Physics B continues the student’s exploration of mechanics while also guiding them through some other important topics of physics. Students begin by exploring simple harmonic motion, wave properties, and optics. Students then learn the basics of thermodynamics and fluids. Afterwards, the students explore the principles of electricity and magnetism. Finally, students explore the area of physics known as Modern Physics, which includes topics such as the photoelectric effect, nuclear science, and relativity. This is a trig based course. It is assumed you know and can use trigonometry.
*Prerequisites: Biology and Physical Science, Algebra I

Precalculus (1 credit)

Semester A
In this course, students will understand and apply concepts, graphs and applications of a variety of families of functions, including polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, logistic and trigonometric. An emphasis will be placed on use of appropriate functions to model real world situations and solve problems that arise from those situations. A focus is also on graphing functions by hand and understanding and identifying the parts of a graph. A scientific and/or graphics calculator is recommended for work on assignments, and on examinations.

Semester B
Pre-Calculus Part B covers the major units of Introductory Trigonometry and Graphs, Trigonometric Equations and Identities, Analytical Trigonometry, Sequences and Series, Conic Sections and an Introduction to Calculus. A focus is also on graphing functions by hand and understanding and identifying the parts of a graph.
*Prerequisite: C or higher in Algebra 2 or Teacher Approval

Principals of IT (1 credit)

Semester A
Develop your students’ understanding and proficiency of computers! Students will learn about computer hardware, Von Neumann architecture, peripherals, and maintenance as well as data management and storage options. Learners will trace the history of operating systems and application software while also exploring network systems, administration, and troubleshooting. Finally, students will dive into word processing, spreadsheets, and databases to cement their knowledge of information technology!

Semester B
Building on the prior prerequisite course, you will gain further knowledge of information technology. Starting with an overview of programming, algorithms, and compilers, students will then learn the basics of webpage design and creating graphics. You will also explore security and cybercrime, emerging technologies, presentation software, and intellectual property laws. Finally, you will prepare for the future by discovering various careers in this field and planning your education!

Psychology (1 credit)

Semester A
In Psychology A the student begins with a brief history of psychologists and their experimental methods. Next they examine personality theories. Then human development from the infant stage through adult stage is explored. Finally, the last part of the course is about consciousness: sleep, dreams, and conscious-altering substances. Students are encouraged to increase their own self-awareness as they move through the course.

Semester B
Students continue to learn about psychology. Students examine the nature of intelligence in humans and animals, including the origin of intelligence and how to measure it. They learn about learning with an emphasis on classical and operant conditioning. Students also investigate social psychology and psychological disorders. They demonstrate their understanding by completing projects in which they play roles like teacher, parent, and psychologist.

Public Speaking (1 credit)

Semester A
Do you strive to gain more confidence when speaking in front of people? Learn techniques from famous speakers throughout history while learning what it takes to make a great speech. Develop skills that will serve you well throughout your career and personal life.

Semester B
Building on the prior prerequisite course, bring your speeches to life by learning about body language, vocal, and other techniques. Learn about logic and reason while gaining the confidence to help create and deliver great presentations and speeches. You will also critically examine your speeches and presentations and those of others to improve upon your presentation.
Reading & Writing for a Purpose (½ credit) This course introduces useful, real-world information by having students learn to read legal, insurance, employment, and vehicle related documents. Furthermore, students will explore media bias, trends in journalism, word structures, and research strategies. To entrench real-world applications, students will learn how to critically read, identify good sources of information, and create an outline, making this course an asset to building life and study skills.

Sociology (½ credit)

Sociology examines the basics of sociology, which is the study of society including individuals, human groups, and organizations. The course is divided into four main areas: the sociological perspective, social structures, inequality in society, and social institutions and change. Students will examine controversies around social change, inequality, gender, and race. The course revolves around an overview of the field with projects that offer the student a chance to explore from a sociologist’s perspective.

Spanish 1 (1 credit)

Semester A
Spanish 1, Semester A, is an introduction to Spanish language and culture. Students learn to start with the basics of greetings and basic conversation, working to incorporate ideas from their life and experiences in Spanish conversation. This will be accomplished through written and verbal expression of the Spanish language.

Semester B
Building upon Semester A, Spanish 1 Semester B expands to asking questions and conversational Spanish throughout one’s neighborhood and daily life. Through real-life scenarios and learning examples, students will describe situations, in Spanish, both verbally and written.

Spanish 2 (1 credit)

Semester A
Students build upon the foundation developed in Spanish 1. They continue to build vocabulary, learn new verb tenses and other grammar concepts, and they increase their ability to communicate with others. They learn new concepts, like reflexive verbs, infinitive expressions, commands, the imperfect tense. Semester B will continue building on vocabulary, grammar concepts and communicating effectively in the target language. You will explore new countries where Spanish is spoken and continue to keep abreast of current events in the Spanish-speaking world.

Semester B
Semester B will continue building on vocabulary, grammar concepts and communicating effectively in the target language. You will explore new countries where Spanish is spoken and continue to keep abreast of current events in the Spanish-speaking world.
*Prerequisite: Successful completion of two semesters of Spanish I

Spanish 3 (1 credit)

Students continue to develop their ability in reading, writing, speaking, and understanding Spanish through a systematic review of its structure. Students focus on applying vocabulary in a wider array of situations by learning about the past progressive and subjunctive moods and the present perfect, future, and conditional tenses.
*Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish I and Spanish II

Study Skills (½ credit)

The Study Skills and Strategies course equips students with skills and understandings critical to effective learning. Using a unique approach to the traditional topic of study skills, this course weaves understanding regarding the role of the brain in learning into the instruction of discrete learning skills and strategies. Moving beyond a list of good tips and ideas, the Study Skills and Strategies course will challenge students to develop intentional approaches to learning. They will be required to make connections between the strategies and skills they learn in this course and the implementation of those strategies and skills in their other coursework. Upon completion of the course, students will have learned a variety of specific learning skills and strategies, gained greater understanding of their own learning preferences, and become prepared to develop and implement specific learning and study plans for any academic course or other learning needs.

Theater Studies (½ credit)

Have you ever wondered how a play goes from the playwright’s mind all the way into a multi- million dollar Broadway production? In this course, you’ll learn the whole process! This course provides a thorough introduction to the theater by providing an overview of major topics in theater studies, with a blend of theoretical and practical lessons. In the first half of this course you will learn about the definitions of theater, theater history, and contemporary theatrical genres. The second of half of the course will guide you through all of the elements of putting on a professional theatrical production. You will learn about the entire production process, from playwriting through opening night, including elements of technical theater, the rehearsal process, and audience response. Whether you’re an aspiring actor, technician, director, or producer, or even just an avid theater-goer, this course is for you.

World Geography (1 credit)

Semester A
The student will be taught to use the basic skills of map reading and development, geographic technology, and the recognition of geographic themes to make sense of the world. The course examines world regions including the nations, people, and cultures of the Americas and Western Europe.

Semester B
This second-semester course continues to teach the basic skills of map reading and development, the use of geographic technology, and the recognition of geographic themes. The focus examines the world regions, including the nations, people, and cultures of Central Europe and Northern Eurasia, Central and Southwest Asia, South Asia, Africa, East Asia, and the Pacific.