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High School

Grades 9-12

Engaging Minds

Accel Management Platform for Education curriculum offers rich and engaging content that has been carefully designed to meet the standards required by states. Students are engaged in a variety of activities and assessments appropriate to the courses being studied, including labs, journals, written assignments, discussions, group and individual projects, formative assessments, objective tests, and written exams.

Language Arts 9

Semester A – English for grade 9 is an integrated curriculum. Each unit contains thematically related lessons in five domains: reading and the study of literature, reading informational text, writing, speaking and listening, and language study, which includes word knowledge and grammar skills. Topics are presented in ways that help young adolescents relate literacy skills to other aspects of their lives. Writing assignments include narrative, expository, and persuasive/argumentative modes and emphasize the use of and details and reasoning to support ideas. Speaking and listening lessons in Semester A emphasize collaborative discussion skills and peer review. Vocabulary development instruction is integrated into literature and informational text lessons. Each unit ends with an authentic assessment that presents students with a real-world scenario requiring some of the skills they learned in the unit.

Semester B – Like semester A, semester B consists of integrated units focused on a theme or mode of study. Literature study in semester B focuses on the analysis of different forms of literature and on comparative studies of world literature and literature delivered in different media. Writing and informational text lessons guide students through the stages of research and demonstrate how to evaluate, integrate, and share the information gathered during research. Students are required to share their ideas and analysis using several different modes, including oral and multimedia presentations.

Language Arts 10

Semester A – English for grade 10 is an integrated curriculum, with each unit consisting of thematically related lessons in five domains: analyzing literature, analyzing informational text, writing, speaking and listening, and language study, which includes word knowledge and grammar skills. The skills that students practice for this course are similar to the skills in English 9 but require more independence and depth of thought. An introductory lesson at the start of each unit helps students identify any areas of weakness and review those topics before starting the more challenging grade 10 lessons. Writing assignments required in Semester A of this course include fiction, expository, and persuasive, and analytical modeses, emphasizing the use of details, evidence, and reasoning to support ideas. Speaking and listening lessons in Semester A cover collaborative discussion skills, the peer review process, and how to plan and deliver informative speeches and presentations. Vocabulary development instruction is integrated into literature and informational text lessons. Each unit ends with an authentic assessment that presents students with a real-world scenario requiring some of the skills they learned in the unit.

Semester B – Like semester A, semester B consists of integrated units focused on a theme or mode of study. Literature study in semester B focuses on the analysis of different forms of literature and as well as the evaluation of various modes and forms of writing. Writing and informational text lessons guide students through the stages of a rigorous research process and demonstrate how to evaluate, integrate, and share the information gathered during research. Students are required to share their ideas and analysis using several different modes, including oral and multimedia presentations.

Language Arts 11

Semester A – English for grade 11 is an American Literature course, with units organized chronologically according to periods in literary history. As students read foundation works of literature and other historical documents written between 1600 and 1900, they’ll review and extend skills in five domains: analyzing literature, analyzing informational text, writing, speaking and listening, and language study, which includes word knowledge and grammar skills. Each module or unit begins with a lesson that provides historical context for the era and introduces themes that emerged in the literature of that era. Each lesson provides students with an opportunity to review basic analysis skills before applying those skills to works of literature or key historical documents. Lessons focused on more difficult historical documents include activities that help students comprehend the complex ideas in these works.

Writing modes addressed in Semester A of this course include narrative, reflective, persuasive, and analytical modes. Assignments emphasize the use of details, evidence, and reasoning to support ideas; writing lessons include model essays that demonstrate key features of each mode. The speaking and listening lessons in Semester A cover rhetoric, the peer review or writing workshop process, and performance skills. Vocabulary development instruction is integrated into literature and informational text lessons. Each unit ends with an authentic assessment that presents students with a real-world scenario requiring some of the skills they learned in the unit.

Semester B – Semester B of English 11 consists of units focused on historical eras and literary movements of the 20th and 21st century, such as Naturalism, Imagism, the Harlem Renaissance, and Post-Modernism. Literature analysis lessons in semester B focus on the forms of literature that were most commonly written during the Twentieth Century and how the forms, styles, and techniques of that century inform literature written today. Students will also evaluate various modes and forms of language expression, including single media and multimedia messages. Writing and informational text lessons guide students through the stages of a rigorous research process and demonstrate how to evaluate, integrate, and share the information gathered during research. Students are required to share their ideas and analysis using several different modes, including oral and multimedia presentations.

Language Arts 12

Semester A: – Students examine major works of literature organized into thematic units. Each unit contains poetry, short stories, and a novel that revolve around the theme for the unit. Themes include the self, relationships, alienation, choice, and death. As students read these works, they have the opportunity to reflect on these important themes by writing in multiple modes and creating cross-disciplinary projects.

Semester B – “There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so” – Shakespeare Welcome to the contemporary world literature course. In this course you will experience the novels, short stories, poetry, and non-fiction from countries around the world. You will discover that the writers in this course have ideas and lives as interesting as their work. You will discover many writers have unique writing styles, unique ideas, unique lives, and unique approaches to their art. You will also have the chance to do some unique work of your own. By reading contemporary work and some work of the 20th century you will also discover that “no matter what a writer’s origins, certain themes and events have been hard to run away from in the 20th and early 21st centuries.” As you read, it is my hope that you will come to an understanding that, “. . .reading literature from around the world is unlikely to teach you everything there is to know about a culture. But it may help. . .” Along this journey you will use technology, writing, reflection, vocabulary, research, and other academic and personal skills to help you learn to enter the world of your community, your country, and your world. As the poet Gwendolyn Brooks said, “I believe that we should all know each other, we human carriers of so many pleasurable differences. To not know is to doubt, to shrink from, sidestep or destroy.” So begin your own journey through the world, and do this by reading, writing about what you read, and experiencing the work of writers.

ALGEBRA 1

Semester A introduces students to the world of Algebra through expressions and equations. Students will evaluate algebraic expressions, solve linear equations and graph them. This course also steers students through various real-world scenarios with the emphasis on using basic statistics to interpret the information given and found. Students learn through online lesson materials, videos and interactive activities. The end of each unit tests students’ understanding with a self-check quiz with feedback. Also included is a unit exam and project for students to apply what they have learned. Teacher feedback is provided throughout the semester.

Semester B builds on the concepts learned in the first semester by providing a strong foundation in solving problems. Students will work with problems and applications that involve exponents, quadratic equations, polynomials and factoring methods, rational and radical equations, data analysis and probability. Students will interact with course materials through online lessons, videos, interactive questions and real-world applications. Each unit ends with a self-check quiz to confirm knowledge of the concepts learned. There is also a unit exam and project. Teacher feedback is given throughout the course.

ALGEBRA 2

This course further extends the learner’s understanding of major algebra concepts, and prepares them with the building blocks needed to dive deeper into trigonometry, pre-calculus and advanced probability and statistics. Topics include radicals, quadratic functions and equations, polynomials, rationals, systems of equations and inequalities, exponents and logarithms, sequences and series, probability and statistics and trigonometry.

CONSUMER MATH

This course focuses on the mathematics involved in making wise consumer decisions. Students explore the many ways in which mathematics affects their daily lives. The first semester will cover paychecks and wages, taxes, insurance, budgets, bank accounts, credit cards, interest calculations, and comparison shopping. Second semester topics include vehicle and home purchasing, investing, and business and employee management.

GEOMETRY

Semester A – Geometry is the study of the measurement of the world. What makes Geometry so engaging is the relationship of figures and measures to each other, and how these relationships can predict results in the world around us. Through practical applications, the student sees how geometric reasoning provides insight into everyday life. The course begins with the tools needed in Geometry. From these foundations, the student explores the measure of line segments, angles, and two-dimensional figures. Students will learn about similarity, triangles and trigonometric ratios. Geometry A consists of six modules. Each module comprises ten lessons for a total of 60 lessons in the course.

Semester B – This course builds on the foundation of the first terms in Geometry. As in previous courses, deductive and inductive reasoning are emphasized, while applying problem-solving techniques to real-world problems. Students explore quadrilaterals and circles, and learn how an object is transformed, as well as how to represent that transformation algebraically and geometrically. Students calculate area and volume of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional objects. Geometry B consists of six modules. Each module comprises ten lessons for a total of 60 lessons in the course.

PRE-CALCULUS

In this course, students will understand and apply concepts, graphs and applications of a variety of families of functions, including polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, logistic and trigonometric. An emphasis will be placed on use of appropriate functions to model real world situations and solve problems that arise from those situations. A focus is also on graphing functions by hand and understanding and identifying the parts of a graph. A scientific and/or graphics calculator is recommended for work on assignments, and on examinations. Pre-Calculus Part B covers the major units of Introductory Trigonometry and Graphs, Trigonometric Equations and Identities, Analytical Trigonometry, Sequences and Series, Conic Sections and an Introduction to Calculus. A focus is also on graphing functions by hand and understanding and identifying the parts of a graph.

AMERICAN HISTORY

Semester A: Creation of a Nation – This course covers the discovery, development, and growth of the United States. Major topics include; American Indian cultures, European colonization of the Americas, and the causes and effects of the American Revolution. Geographical, economic, and political factors are explores as the key factors in the growth of the United States of America. American History I is a survey of the struggle to build the United States of America from the colonial period to the beginning of the twentieth century. By means of reading, analyzing, and applying historical data, students come to appreciate the forces that shaped our history and character as an American people. Not only are the topics of American history discussed, but students also explore research methods and determine accurate sources of data from the past. Knowing the facts and dates of history are just the beginning: each student must understand how history affects him or her.

Semester B: Expansion of a Nation – American History B begins with a study of American life before the 1929 Stock Market crash and how the Roaring Twenties influenced society in the late 19th through early 20th centuries. Students will examine the causes and consequences of the Great Depression and move on into a detailed study of World War II with an emphasis on America’s role in the conflict. The course continues with an analysis of the Cold War struggle and America’s rise as a superpower. The Civil Rights and Women’s rights movements, pollution and the environment, and American domestic and foreign policy will be examined. The course wraps up with a summary of current events and issues, including a study of the Middle East. This course begins with an assessment of life in United States pre-World War I and ends with the conflicts of the new millennium. Students look at the nation in terms of economic, social, and political trends. The experiences of the last century are summarized, including a look into the civil rights issues that have embroiled the nation in conflict. The development of the United States of America into a superpower is explored within a global context.

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

This course will guide students through an in-depth study of the history, structure, and guiding principles of American government. The first unit will review the origins of government in general and American government in particular—from the earliest models for democracy to the founding documents that created a federalist system of government in the U.S. Several units will help students explore the roles and responsibilities of each branch of government as well as the impact that the Constitution has had and continues to have on the way government works and on the lives of individual Americans. The course’s final unit will guide students through a series of projects that require them to apply what they have learned about American government to an issue that interests them.

WORLD HISTORY

Semester A – World History begins with a focus on the skills needed to read, understand, and analyze history, also demonstrating how historians and social scientists arrive at their conclusions about human history.  Semester A covers the history of civilization from hunter-gatherer societies through the characteristics of the earliest civilizations to the Enlightenment period in Western Europe. The second half of Semester A explores early intellectual, spiritual, and political movements and their impact on interactions among world cultures.

Semester B – Semester B applies the reading and analytical strategies introduced in Semester A to the events and movements that created the modern world. In the second semester, World History emphasizes the effects of the Industrial Revolution and changing attitudes about science and religion as well as the impact of European colonization. Students are encouraged to make connections between World War I and II and events related to the Cold War and between 19th-century imperialism and modern independence movements.

ECONOMICS

This course introduces the principles and the applications of economics in everyday life. Students develop an understanding of limited resources, and compare it with unlimited wants and needs. Students learn how individual and national economic decisions are made to allocate goods and services among competing users. Students apply economic principles to think and problem solve. The study of Economics uses the view of economic institutions and policies to explore the history, organization, and functions of the U.S. government in controlling our economy. It offers students learning opportunities that build one on another. A goal of the course is for the student to develop the critical skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in a demanding and thoughtful academic setting. Students are encouraged to use their knowledge of the policies and institutions of economics to develop their own views on current economic and monetary issues. They are taught how to apply what they have learned into personal financial activities. The course looks closely at the economic knowledge and values of the country and gives students a look into the problems faced by presidents, and congressional representatives. It also covers the roles of political activists, political parties, interest groups, and the media in shaping the U. S. economy. The Supreme Court is presented as the voice of reason in the balance of powers. Students are encouraged to perform at higher levels as they are presented with historical documents and additional readings, work with a set of facts arranged by theme, become skillful in note-taking, and join in student discussions. Students develop and demonstrate their writing skills by preparing extended research-based papers.

CHEMISTRY

Semester A – In this course, students will discover what chemistry is, and how it is used and found all around us. The importance of the scientific method to solve real world problems will be investigated. Knowledge will be gained in the following areas: types of matter, atomic structure, chemical periodicity, chemical formula writing and naming, chemical equations. This course will also stress the important relationship between math and science while studying measurement, metric system and stoichiometry. Students will use higher order thinking throughout the entire course. An algebra background is recommended because of the amount and type of math involved.

Semester B – It follows the Chemistry 1 A course. In Chemistry 1 B, students will investigate chemical bonding, thermochemistry, and acids and bases. The importance of the scientific method to solve real world problems will be investigated. Knowledge will be gained in the following areas: organic chemistry, biochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. This course will also stress the important relationship between math and science. Students will use higher order thinking throughout the entire course. An algebra background is recommended because of the amount and type of math involved.

PHYSICS

Semester A – Students begin their exploration of physics by reviewing the International System of Units (SI), scientific notation, and significant digits. They then learn to describe and analyze motion in one and two dimensions. Students learn about gravity and Newton’s laws of motion before concluding the course with an examination of circular motion. Students apply mathematical concepts such as graphing and trigonometry in order to solve physics problems. Throughout the course, students apply their understanding of physics by playing roles like science museum curator and elementary teacher.

Semester B – Physics B continues the student’s exploration of mechanics while also guiding them through some other important topics of physics.  Students begin by exploring simple harmonic motion, wave properties, and optics. Students then learn the basics of thermodynamics and fluids. Afterwards, the students explore the principles of electricity and magnetism. Finally, students explore the area of physics known as Modern Physics, which includes topics such as the photoelectric effect, nuclear science, and relativity. This is a trig based course. It is assumed you know and can use trigonometry.

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY

Semester A – The aim of this course is to expand upon what was learned in your Biology class, while emphasizing the application of this material to human structures and functions. This course begins the study of human beings at the microscopic level and works its way up to an in-depth study of select organ systems. Special emphasis will be placed upon applying and demonstrating the information learned in this course through, not only tests and quizzes, but through special projects and collaboration as well.

Semester B – Part B is designed to give the student an understanding of how structure and function are related in the human body. The student will study the human body from the cellular level to the organ system level. All of the major body systems will be studied in great detail. Additionally, biochemistry, cell biology, histology, biotechnology, bioethics, and pathology will also be studied. This course is highly recommended for students seeking a career in science or a health-related profession.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Semester A – The first three modules of Semester 1 cover Scientific Inquiry, the Structure and Composition of the Universe, and the Features of the Solar System. Students learn the importance of scientific inquiry and how to communicate the results of scientific investigations. They then have material on the formation of the universe, including the Big Bang Theory, the motions of celestial objects, and stellar evolution. The third module covers material related to the Solar System, including features of the Sun and the planets and the movements of Earth. The second three modules of Semester 1 cover Weather, Climate, and Earth’s Water Cycle. Students first learn in Module 4 about the atmosphere and clouds, as well as the factors that influence local and global climate. In Module 5 they continue by learning about weather and air masses, meteorology and storms. Module 6 then discusses the water cycle, including groundwater and ocean features, as well as water scarcity and pollution.

Semester B – The first three modules of Semester 2 cover the physical structure of the Earth and Earth’s tectonic system, including the rock cycle, tectonic activity, and mountain building. It then covers weathering and erosion and soil formation. The next material in the course then addresses the concept of systems; it addresses the Earth as a system, feedback in systems, and Earth’s major nutrient cycles. The second three modules of Semester 2 cover geologic history, including the evolution of Earth’s atmosphere, the geologic time scale, and the fossil record. It then goes over natural resources and the effects of human population on natural resources. The course wraps up with a discussion of human society and its interconnectedness with the Earth’s environment, how science and technology work together, and the technological design process in earth science applications.

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

Semester A – This is an introduction to the Physical Sciences and scientific methodology. The objectives are to impart a basic knowledge of the physical properties and chemistry of matter. Skills are developed in the classroom, and reinforced through homework reading, and interesting labs that relate to everyday life.

Semester B – This is an introduction to the Physical Sciences and scientific methodology. The objectives are to impart a basic knowledge of the physical properties and chemistry of matter. Skills are developed in the classroom, and reinforced through homework reading, and interesting labs that relate to everyday life.

  • Physical Education
  • Health
  • Study Skills
  • Creative Writing
  • Contemporary Novels
  • Pre-Calculus
  • Chemistry Physics
  • Anatomy & Physiology
  • Psychology Sociology
  • Geography Art
  • Art Appreciation
  • History
  • Graphic Art & Design
  • Music Appreciation
  • Theater Studies
  • Media & Communications
  • French I, French II
  • Spanish I, Spanish II, Spanish III

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